A first-look photo released by San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance on July 9168baccarat, 2024 shows Yun Chuan168baccarat, an almost five-year-old male panda, at his new home at the San Diego Zoo in San Diego, California, the United States. (San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance/Handout via Xinhua)

LOS ANGELES, July 9 (Xinhua) -- San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance on Tuesday shared first-look photos of the highly anticipated panda pair, Yun Chuan and Xin Bao, as they continue settling into their new home here following their arrival in the United States last month.

The panda duo, the first to enter the United States in 21 years, are acclimating well to their new home in a private habitat and will not be viewable to the public for several weeks, said the zoo in a press release.

168baccarat|U.S. San Diego Zoo shares first-look photos of two pandas from China

Yun Chuan and Xin Bao arrived in California from China on June 27 for a 10-year international giant panda protection cooperation with San Diego Zoo, marking a new round of such collaboration between the two nations.

"Yun Chuan is an almost five-year-old male," said the zoo, adding that "he's identifiable by his long, slightly pointed nose and seems to be extremely comfortable whether he is exploring on the grass or climbing trees."

The zoo noted that Xin Bao is a nearly four-year-old female whose name means "precious treasure of prosperity and abundance."

"She is best recognized by her large, round face and big, fluffy ears, and she enjoys sunbathing quietly and focusing on her favorite food," the zoo added.

Over the past week, the San Diego Zoo worked closely with Chinese experts to cater to the dietary needs and preferences of the giant pandas. The teams provided a variety of fresh bamboo and even created a local adaptation of wowotou, a traditional Chinese bun also called "panda bread," said the zoo.

To help the beloved black-and-white bears adjust to their new home, the teams conducted food adaptability exercises and weight monitoring sessions. Additionally, veterinary teams from both countries are keeping a close eye on the pandas' health, tracking their weight, appetite and other health indicators daily to ensure they thrive in their new environment, according to the zoo.

San Diego Zoo, one of the most visited zoo in the country, is the first U.S. zoo to have a cooperative conservation program with Chinese partners. Located north of downtown San Diego in Balboa Park, it is home to more than 12,000 rare and endangered animals representing over 680 species and subspecies.

The panda pair were selected from the China Conservation and Research Center for the Giant Panda (CCRCGP), which has conducted scientific research cooperation with San Diego Zoo for over 25 years, with fruitful results in the protection, breeding, and disease control of giant pandas, and related public education.

Giant pandas are one of the world's most endangered species. Nearly 1,900 pandas live in the wild, mostly in the provinces of Sichuan and Shaanxi in China, rising from 1,100 in the 1980s.

A first-look photo released by San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance on July 9, 2024 shows Xin Bao, a nearly four-year-old female panda, at her new home at the San Diego Zoo in San Diego, California, the United States. (San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance/Handout via Xinhua)